Heart Attack and Cardiac Recovery – Simplify Your Life

simplifyI thought about changing the title to “Cardiac Recovery Step 1 – More Porn” in order to get you to read this.  A few years ago, I would never have continued past the headline “Simplify your Life”.  Sounds like a load of new age nonsense.

That was before I died.

Now that I have a second chance at life (as may you), I am a little more open to new concepts.  Cardiac recovery begins with simplifying your life.  After all, you may have just lived through a major cardiac event – you don’t need more complexity in your life.  You need to simplify in order to recover, get healthy, and enjoy life.

It’s Simple, So It’s Easy, Right?

Wrong.  Simplifying is difficult; it means shedding bad habits and behaviors.  It means changing the way you live.  It means changing your values.  It means changing the way you think about the things you have and the things you want.  In addition to being an irresponsible man-child, I am also a gadget guy with a short attention span and I like things!  While I still accumulate my fair share of them, here is what I have given up over the past few years:

  • Smoking
  • Drinking alcohol
  • Drinking soda
  • Junk food (mostly)
  • Chocolate (somewhat)
  • Gym membership
  • Cable TV
  • Satellite radio

So why did give all this up?  Smoking and bad genes are what killed me in the first place.  Many people thought I should quit that habit.

Drinking wasn’t helping me out either.  If I drank, I wanted to smoke.  If I drank too much, my heart went into A-fib.  If I was hung over, I wanted to sit on the couch, watch, TV and eat bad food – while in A-fib (told you I was a mess).

There have been a few studies over the years that indicate diet may have a role in heart disease. I have mostly stopped drinking soda, eating junk food, eating handfuls of M&Ms, and chewing a pack of gum a day (did I mention I quit smoking).  As much as possible I eat whole foods and avoid sugar.

Quitting the last three on the list was all about simplification and came with the added benefit of saving money.  I spent more time driving to and from the gym than actually working out at the gym. Cable and satellite can be time sucking black holes of mindless babble.

What do I miss most?  Smoking and Howard Stern.

So what did I gain?  Making a commitment to simplify my life has provided me with more time to eat right, exercise, sleep, and focus on my overall well being.

It’s Simple, So It’s Quick, Right?

Wrong.  There is no quick fix here.  I did a lot of reading and experimenting with different methods to simplify and be more productive.   There are thousands of great books and blogs out there offering all kinds of advice.  A couple that I found helpful were Zen Habits by Leo Babauta and MyrkoThum by well, um,  Myrko Thum.

When I learned Leo Babauta  was previously an out of shape smoker like me, I knew I was in the right place.  Take some time and check out his site.  The site link provided above is to the Getting Started page.  It’s also useful to read his bio.  If I didn’t know better, I would say Leo’s list of changed habits belonged to a cardiac patient.   From quitting smoking, to exercising, eating healthy, and starting a new career.

I have to admit, I am actually not all that familiar with Myrko or his SYSTEM of personal development.  Myrko made MY list because of HIS list at the link above.  A very simple guide to simplification:

  1. Turn down the noise
  2. Clarify what you want and need
  3. Do less without losing anything
  4. Say “No” in Order to Say “Yes”
  5. Declutter
  6. Invite silence into your world

If that list makes you cringe, the site also offers a practical explanation of how to simplify your life in two steps:

“The first is to get clear and to focus on what is really important to you. This means to do more of what makes you truly happy, what you feel you have to do on this world. The second way is to remove as much distraction from your life as possible, so you actually can live in purpose and fulfillment”

For me, this meant getting rid of the unhealthy habits and distractions and focusing on what is important to me and the well being of my family.  Simple enough, right?

If you think you want to explore this topic more, check out the Alltop Lifehack page as a starting off point.  Here you will find everything from how to simplify and declutter to how to build a Bluetooth speaker and why you should own a survival bow & arrow – as if that is not obvious.

I am not following any specific program, list, or person in my path to simplification.  Nor have I quit my job or given away all of my possessions. I just take bits and pieces from all over the place, try a few out, and see what works for cardiac recovery.  When in doubt, I keep it simple.

The full series of Zen and the Art of Cardiac Recovery Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4

Photo credit: Jon Ashcroft / Foter / Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)