Yes, Foot Pain Could Be a Blocked Artery

Blocked Iliac Artery

Like any good cardiac patient, I started exercising regularly after my heart attack.  I began with short walks and eventually built up to running 2-3 miles at a time.  Then my right leg died!

The death of my leg did not happen over night.  I noticed that my leg felt like it was “dragging” when I ran.  The same dragging or sense of weakness then developed when I was walking, particularly on stairs or inclines.   Eventually, I experienced extreme pain in the arch of my foot while running.
Due to the weakness in the leg, I decided I must have a muscular problem.

Dr. Moron

With my own moronic diagnosis in hand, I began an almost two year odyssey of visits to specialists:
  • Chiropractor – advice:  not sure what it is, but keep coming back ($$)
  • Physical Therapist – advice:  not sure what it is, but keep coming back ($$)
  • Acupuncturist – advice:  not sure what it is, but keep coming back ($$)
You get the idea.  I then mentioned the problem to my primary physician during a routine checkup.  He suggested a visit to the neurologist to see if a nerve was being pinched.
I scheduled a visit with the same neurologist that treated me post-cardiac arrest.  She was familiar with my background and suggested a vascular consult before we started messing with nerves and spinal cords.

Pictures Don’t Lie

A quick CT Scan (that’s an actual of my scan above) by the Interventional Radiologist found a 65% blockage in my iliac artery.  You can see the blockage on the left side of the image, right after the split from the aorta.  The iliac artery carries blood from the aorta down to the lower extremities.  A short-time later I had a stent placed in the artery and voila, blood started flowing again.
I learned a few important lesson from this experience:
  1. I am a moron and should stop self diagnosing
  2. I should also consult my primary care physician if something is wrong
  3. I have cardiovascular disease and that has to be factored into any physical issue I am experiencing
That final point is important.  Below is a list of signs & symptoms I found on livestrong.com related to poor blood circulation:
  1. Leg Pain While Walking
  2. Numbness and Weakness
  3. Coldness and Swelling
  4. Non-healing Sores
  5. Changes in Skin Color
  6. Weak Pulse in Legs
  7. Chest Pain (duh!)
  8. Erectile Dysfunction (doh!)
I am learning my lesson and bringing more issues to my doctor’s attention.  I am still getting cramping in my legs and feet.  My primary physician recommended a new statin and vitamin D supplement.  My cardiologist recommended a test for peripheral artery disease (PAD).  Luckily, there were no significant findings.  The point is, if you have a condition such as cardiovascular disease, don’t trivialize it’s impacts downstream.  Be a dork, or maybe even a geek and do some analysis of your own.  And, it should go without saying, talk to your doctor.