Generation XL – From MTV to Obesity

genxperspectives_nirvana-lrgrGeneration X, the MTV generation, my generation, the fattest generation ever! There is an alarming increase in obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and heart attacks in Gen-Xer’s.  And from the looks of things, it’s only going to get worse for Millennials.  Now that I have completely bummed out two entire generations, let’s see what’s behind all of this unhealthiness.

Enter the Aussies

A study done by researchers at the University of Adelaide in Australia has confirmed that if current trends continue, Generation X will overtake Baby Boomers for poor health, including rates of obesity and diabetes. I wouldn’t dismiss this as an Australian problem. According to the American Heart Association, nearly 70% of American adults are either overweight or obese.

Hold on, I thought this was a heart blog, not an obesity blog.  It is, but being obese puts you at a higher risk for heart disease and high blood pressure. Guess what happens to people with heart disease and high blood pressure?  Their left arm starts to hurt.

The researchers found that Gen-X is more than twice as likely to be overweight or obese at 25-44 years of age, compared to Baby Boomers at the same age.  One of the coauthors of the study, Ms. Rhiannon Pilkington, suggests there is growing evidence the the trend is happening world wide.

So what is fueling the rise in obesity for Gen Xer’s when compared to Baby Boomers?  According to Ms. Pilkington, it’s because we sit on our ass and eat junk food.  Ok, she actually stated it this way:

Although the two groups in our study did not seem to have any difference in levels of physical activity, our lifestyles and food environments have changed dramatically over recent decades.

So both generations are equally active, what gives Ms. Pilkington?

Transport options and workplaces encourage sedentary behaviour, and food high in fat and sugar is often more readily available than a healthier alternative. This may account for why the younger generation is developing unhealthy weight levels at an earlier age.

See, I told you it’s because we sit on our ass and eat junk food.  If you haven’t seen it before, check out my series on cardiac recovery for tips on exercising and eating healthy.

All This Obesity is Stressing Me Out!

As a Gen-Xer, I am supposed to be indifferent about the Millennial generation (Gen-Y).  But it’s hard not to feel bad for them.  The Millennials may be the first generation to see rising rates of early-onset obesity related diseases such as high blood pressure, type-2 diabetes, and elevated cholesterol.  To put things in perspective, the number of young adults (18-29) who are obese has more than tripled in the last 40 years.

Millennials are overachievers.  In addition to being obese, they are completely stressed out.  Unfortunately, a lethal cardiac combo. According to a report by the American Psychological Association, with the exception of Millennials (those 18-33 years of age), all other age groups reported decreasing levels of stress.  So why are the Millennials so stressed?  Here is what the survey found:

  • 76 percent were stressed out about work;
  • 73 percent fretted over money;
  • 59 percent obsessed over relationships’
  • 56 percent were faced with intense family responsibilities;
  • 55 percent were freaked out over the current state of the economy.
  • Money for nothing and chicks for free sounded sensible when I was younger.

Don’t worry Gen-Y, in addition to offering tips for healthy eating and exercising, my series on cardiac recovery also offers tips on simplifying your life and relaxing.

Money for Nothing

Who knew that money for nothing and chicks for free would lead to obesity and heart attacks?  Both of our most recent generations are facing serious health issues.  It’s time we clean up our act.  Not only can we save our lives, but we can start providing a good example for the next generation, our children.

References:

The University of Adelaide. Gen X Obesity a Major Problem for Healthcare, Workforce. The University of Adelaide News and Events. N.p., 27 Mar. 2014. Web. 22 June 2014.

Pilkington, Rhiannon, Anne W. Taylor, Graeme Hugo, and Gary Wittert. Are Baby Boomers Healthier than Generation X? A Profile of Australia’s Working Generations Using National Health Survey Data. PLOS One. University of Adelaide, 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 22 June 2014.

Pew Research Center. (2010). Millennials: A Portrait of Generation Next. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/files/2010/10/millennials-confident-connected-open-to-change.pdf

Watson, Elwood. “Millennial Stress College Years and Beyond.” Diverseeducation. N.p., 6 Mar. 2013. Web. 26 June 2014.