HeartGeek Year In Review

2014I hope everyone had a happy and healthy holiday season.  I am in vacation mode – which means I am being lazy and not writing new posts.  Seems like a good time to look back on this past year’s most popular posts:

  1. My Favorite Heart Health Gadget – My first gadget review. The Alivecor is a portable device that provides a real-time electrocardiogram (ECG) on your cell phone. Another favorite is the Basis Peak fitness watch.
  2. Heart Attack and Cardiac Recovery – Get Off Your Ass – It’s good to see an interest in exercise. This post provides strategies to get moving and stay motivated.
  3. Exercise After 40? It’s Not Too Late! – More of a reference than a post. Provides a link to a study that found starting exercise at 40 has the same heart benefits as starting exercise earlier in life.
  4. Heart Attack and Cardiac Recovery – Stop Eating Crap – A post describing my experiments with different diets and a top 10 of what really worked.
  5. Heart Attack and Cardiac Recovery – Simplify Your Life – Tips for getting rid of the unhealthy habits and distractions and focusing on what is important – your health!

Those were the most read posts this past year and I truly appreciate you taking the time to read them. I also had a few favorites (in no particular order):

  1. What is a Cardiac Arrest? –Learn the difference between a cardiac arrest and a heart attack in this post.
  2. Sugar Increase Your Risk of Dying From Heart Disease – Fatty foods are considered enemy number one for cardiac patients. This post explains why sugar may be just as dangerous.
  3. What is Your Child’s Risk of a Heart Attack? – Healthy living is a family commitment. Strategies to get our kids moving and head off early heart disease.
  4. How To Prevent Your Next Heart Attack – Strategies for planning the rest of your life.
  5. The Best Supplements For Heart Health – Find out what supplements can increase your overall energy, allow you to exercise more, have less fatigue, less muscle pain and cramping, and even get a better nights sleep.

I imagine everyone is starting to make their resolutions.   Exercise, diet, etc. are all good and I wish you the best.   Check back in here throughout the year if you need a little motivation.  In case you are struggling with resolutions, there is a good post on Zenhabits describing the benefits of establishing new habits over making resolutions.

I am trying to figure out what to do with this blog in 2015.  Let me know what you liked and didn’t like over the past year.  What information do you find most beneficial?

Thanks, and Happy New Year!

Paul

Heart Attack and Cardiac Recovery – Stop Eating Crap

pick your poisonAfter  bypass surgery, I was discharged with a green light to eat whatever I liked because I was extremely weak and anemic. I needed the calories, protein, fat, and iron found in the typical crappy American diet. It seemed rather enabling, but who was I to argue with the doctor. I did enjoy my fatty meals and desserts, but I also knew it couldn’t last forever; I had to stop eating crap! This post explains how I made that happen.

Like most cardiac patients, I believed my biggest concern should be reducing cholesterol. It makes sense to start here since most of us ended up on an operating table as a result of clogged arteries. It is also an easy place to start since most of us are on a statin such as Lipitor and get an immediate assist.

Although I truly believe in the benefits of statins and will likely remain on one for life, I also have a problem with them. They give a false sense of security. How many times have you finished a huge steak covered in cheese sauce and said “I guess I will have to double up on the Lipitor tonight”.  Adorable, aren’t you?

You Are What You Eat

If this is true, I was eating moron. I would estimate that I ate about 75% healthy and 25% crap for a number of years after my event. I could make myself eat pretty well at breakfast and lunch. Evenings and weekends were another story. If you have young kids like me, you end up serving and eating a lot of mac & cheese, pizza, and ice cream. And as proof that I am not the most responsible person, I began to eat worse once I started exercising. I figured I was working out, I could eat whatever I like, right?

In fact, the answer is no. The American Heart Association provides the following as a basic guideline for diet and cardiac health:

  • Don’t intake mass quantities of calories
  • Eat a variety of nutritious foods including vegetables, unrefined whole grains, lean proteins, and fish.
  • Avoid nutrient-poor food

Sounds sensible, and it is. But it also sounds extremely boring and like something my mother would tell me. I have a long history of ignoring the good advice of my mother.

The Pretty Pig

I needed to put some lipstick on this ugly pig called eating right. I stumbled upon Tim Ferris’ blog while looking for ways to get rich by working four hours per week. Although I haven’t pulled that off (yet), I did find a lot of very useful information regarding diet.

I was drawn to the experiments Tim describes that test the relationship between food and exercise and the impact on weight and muscle gain. I tried a couple of his experiments and learned some interesting lessons along the way. For example, gorging and heavy weight lifting in your mid-forties produces fat not muscle (I gained 10 lbs of neck fat). Fun experiment, but not quite so effective (or attractive).

With my added neck fat in tow, I decided to see what Tim had on weight loss as opposed to muscle gain. I tried the slow-carb diet. On the slow-carb diet, you basically don’t eat anything processed or white – sugar, flour, dairy. You do eat a lot of that same meals (over and over again) that contain a combination lean protein, vegetables, and beans. And the best part, you get a cheat day once a week to eat whatever you like.

I had pretty good luck combining this diet with a regular exercise routine. I lost a few pounds, gained a little muscle, and felt overall more healthy. It also helps that you don’t have to be great cook on the slow-carb diet. On the flip side, egg whites, chicken, broccoli, and black beans gets pretty boring after a month or two.

Cardio Caveman

I followed the basic guideline of the slow-carb diet for quite awhile. The only difference being that I eventually was up to about three cheat days a week. Knowing I needed to get back on track, I went in search of a new program to keep me engaged.

I found the Paleo diet. The basic concept here is to mimic the diet of our prehistoric forefathers. Somehow, we know that there was very little cardiovascular disease back in the paleolithic days. Therefore, reverting back to a caveman lifestyle will lead to improved cardiovascular health. Stepping back in time is not a big stretch for a hairy backed dimwit such as myself. It’s probably this same dimwittedness that led me to try the diet ranked dead last on The U.S. News & World Report best diets list.

With that bad news aside, I can tell you that I really enjoyed the Paleo diet. The concept of Paleo is to eat meat (a lot of it) fish, vegetables, eggs, and healthy fats. Do not eat grains, sugars, most dairy, or any processed foods. Basically, if you can kill it or dig it up, you can eat it. Did I mention you get to eat bacon?

The inclusion of significant amounts of meat and eggs in the Paleo diet will scare many cardiac patients off. Maybe rightly so. I set out with the goal of 30 days for Paleo. Partly because of my short attention span, but also because I know there are healthier options out there. What I found over the 30 days is the following:

  • I lost 9 pounds
  • I had more energy
  • I really enjoyed the meals
  • I was never hungry
  • My back got hairier

My Cardio Diet Top 10

As you can see, I like to try new things. That might be a polite way of saying I can’t stick with anything. Regardless, I am motivated to eat more healthy. My experiments keep me entertained and help me maintain focus. When I take the bits and pieces from cardiac eating guidelines and my various experiments, I am left with my Cardio Diet Top 10:

  1. Eat lots of vegetables
  2. Eat some fruit
  3. Eat lean meats
  4. Eat fish
  5. Eat eggs
  6. Limit dairy
  7. Eat the right carbs (complex)
  8. Eliminate/reduce sugar
  9. Eliminate/reduce grains
  10. Don’t listen to me (I’m not a doctor)

The top ten works for me and provides a lot of options and variety. Remember, I am not recommending you go out and eat a lot of bacon. I am only recommending that you find a way to eat healthy. For me, it’s my little experiments.

If you are looking for your own heart-healthy diet programs, a good resource is the best heart-healthy diets on The U.S. News & World Report. My next program will focus on the Mediterranean diet. The benefits seem well established and the menu seems like something the whole family can enjoy.

The full series of Zen and the Art of Cardiac Recovery Part 1Part 2Part 3Part 4

Photo credit: Scott Ableman / Foter /Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)